Culture
Georgian tales Woven by Azerbaijani Women
21 February, 2013
Azerbaijanian Carpet-weaving tradition is restoring

On February 15, Shalva Amiranashvili Museum of Arts of Georgian National Museum opened the exhibition of handmade Azerbaijanian carpets and items that represent Azerbaijanian culture.
The exposition displayed the painting and graphic arts of Azerbaijani artists, along with national musical instruments, vessels made of copper and ceramics, with main focus on carpets. The exhibition was organized by Georgian Ministry of Culture and Monuments’ Protection, Georgian National Museum, Akhundov Museum of Azerbaijanian Culture and its Cultural
Center.
David Lortkipanidze, General Director of Georgian National Museum opened the event. “When we look at these exponents, we notice the heritage of the past and on the other hand, we see the continuation of the tradition. This is probably the exhibition that shows the high level of the Azerbaijanian culture and its essential place in the culture of Georgia, which by itself is a multiethnic country. I am sure that this cooperation will be preserved. Very soon, we plan to organize another exhibition – that of the exponents of Azerbaijanian culture that are preserved at Georgian National Museum. So, this is only a continuation of a very close cooperation and friendship. I thank all parties concerned”.
Leila Alieva, Director of Akhundov Museum, was the second person and the main hostess of the event:”The aim of this exhibition is to show that within the framework of the project financed by the Georgian Ministry of Culture, the process of learning carpet weaving has started. This exhibition is a sum-up of the results that we have received. We also added the exponents showing the restored tradition of Azerbaijanian carpets in Georgia. These are the carpets from private collections – woven by contemporary Azerbaijanian women, as well as other utensils taken from homes.”
Valeri Asatiani, Chairman of the Georgian-Azerbaijan Association of Cultural Relations, also shared his impressions. “It is always interesting to visit the Georgian museum of Fine Arts, as each exposition has its own irreplaceable role. Today’s event is a continuation of the multi-centurial Georgian-Azerbaijanian cultural space. A lot of new things are happening in different realms of bilateral art, including literature etc. I want to thank the whole Georgian National Museum and the Museum of Fine Arts in particular, as well as Akhundov Museum, as what they are doing is not a mere exposition, but a historic event. This is a bridge uniting the past, present and future. “
Lela Tsitsuashvili, Curator of exhibitions of the Georgian National Museum cordially thanked the people in charge of the Akhmedov Museum of Azerbaijanian Culture for creating such a beautiful and festive atmosphere at the exhibition. “I am happy that today we have another chance to highlight the ancient relations that exists between the two countries. Georgian National Museum is actively involved in this direction and is always opened to disclose Georgia’s multiethnic culture, as this is our richness as a whole. I am sure that together with learning a lot, a spectator will get a huge aesthetic pleasure by seeing these carpets and utensils that were with such great love presented by Azerbaijanian Museum to us.”
Emzar Mamed Zade is the representative of the local Azerbaijanian Diaspora who curates the process of restoring carpet-weaving all around Georgia within the project. He was the initiator too. “I take care that these carpets are woven in the same technique as it was 200-300 years ago. Everything starting from colors and ending with thread – is natural. This technique was almost lost, as it was not applied to within the last 50 years at least. I had to go to the villages and search for these women some of whom had inherited weaving machines. However, there were many of them whom we teach weaving. We use the catalogues to restore the exact ornaments. This is not a one-time action. We want to continue it in order to let our children and grandchildren preserve this culture of weaving. As for these carpets and the ones that Azerbaijanians weave in their homeland, there are certain differences in ornaments and colors and first and foremost, wool, which comes from Borchalo region of Georgia and which distinguishes Georgia-made carpets from Azerbaijanian ones.“
The exhibition will last until March 5.
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