Culture
10 Georgian animations You Need To Watch
25 September, 2014
Tsuna and Tsrutsuna

If the most famous mouse in the world is Mickey Mouse, here in Georgia he would be pretty disappointed. Our love belongs to a brave mouse called Tsrutsuna who shows that nothing can stop you when you have love in your life. This cute colorful drawing is a cautionary tale for kids. Its moral is that you’ve got to fight for your love because when something is worth having, it’s worth fighting for and when it gets
tough you’ve got to fight some more. The mice are drawn in such a charming way that after watching this animated short, the mouse in your flat wouldn’t be frightening anymore.

The Dreaming Boy (Sizmara)

When it comes to surrealistic cinema, I always remember Luis Buñuel and David Lynch. But when I think about surrealistic animation the first image that pops up in my head is the Georgian short animation called Sizmara. Do you remember Disney’s Fantasia? The sequence with dancing hippos is pure magic and an unforgettable experience. So is the king’s dream in Sizmara. We have rats dancing traditional Georgian dance and a king waking up frightened covered in sweat. It’s one of the weirdest and greatest animated shorts you will ever see. And behind the fantastic imagery is an anti-totalitarian context. It has a government which is full of bureaucracy. Here we have a minister of eating, a minister of drinking, a war minister and a king who wants to have their dreams because he only dreams about dancing rats.

Feud (Mtroba)

One of the greatest cartoons in the history of Georgian animation – It’s about war between two species of birds. Mtroba criticizes feudalism and the relationship between master and slave. A fight occurs between Falcons and Hawks. They are representative of the master. But they don’t fight, others die instead. Obviously the violence and horrific imagery has been toned down to make the film more accessible to a young audience but not so much that the film becomes cutesy. Far from it. These are not fluffy bunnies; they are real. They get hurt. They fight but they don’t understand why. It’s a stunning work about the nature of war, love and power.

I will come as rain (Me tsvimad moval)


Did you cry while watching opening scene of Up? Well, prepare for crying your heart out when you see Snowball. It is the greatest tearjerker in the history of animation. It has only two characters: a young girl and a talking snowball. And both of them are the cutest things you can possible imagine. It shows the beauty of friendship, of loss and lights up a great sense of hope. Snowball is the kind of animation that everyone should watch despite their age.

Shakro and Zakro

In year the 1973 when every single animated feature was full of talking animals, Georgian director Gabriel Lavrelashvili made an animation about talking cars. Take that Pixar, the world’s greatest animation studio came up with the idea of talking machines 33 years after. This is a visionary work of pioneers with a bright imagination and a highly underrated work of art.

Skillful Master (Khelmarjve ostati)

This short animated film was shot in 1957 and its main protagonist is robot. A friendly artificial intelligence that can fix everything. Although the Master is a working device just like WALL-E (again, take that, Pixar!), it’s charming and full of life like a real person. Skillful Master has five installments and every one of them is creative and highly likeable.

Komble

Komble is a reimagining of a Georgian folktale about a young farmer and his cow, which is stolen from him by his landlord’s servants. It has great tunes, funny songs and beautifully-drawn characters. Komble is like a Disney animation where the prince is in a quest to find and release the princess from an evil dragon. But in this case our prince is just a quirky farmer, the princess is a cow with a silly face and the dragon is a rich landlord who thinks (and sings) only about eating. It shows that despite your social scale, you should stand for your principles and if you are smart, tricky and have an imagination, there is nothing that can stop you from achieving your goal.

Bombora

This is the story of an unlikely friendship between a Georgian mythical creature called Bombora and a young girl. Bombora shows that true friendship can break all barriers. This beautifully drawn and told story has a deep message. It glows with a child-like innocence but never grinds into the sticky-slapstick sentiment that marks so much of modern animated family offerings. The animation tells the viewer that once one sees beyond preconceived notions, a new world of possibilities can bloom. All in all, it is a charming story about love of all kinds.

Watermelon (Sazamtro)

First of all Watermelon is a fantasy – something which Terry Gilliam’s mind might come up with. It gives the impression that the creators were on psychedelic drugs while making this masterpiece. Picture this: A large plate like a flat planet surrounded by nothing except sun and moon. On a flat surface live two men. One of them is a workingman with a kind heart; the second one is lazy loafer. The sun sings with the first man and the moon sings for second one. It’s a magical story about good and bad, about light and dark and it’s told in an extraordinary way. It should be taught in schools because this animation shows perfectly that the sun shines for good-hearted, kind people and not greedy, selfish men.

There Was One Little Mouse (Iko erti tagunia)

There Was One Little Mouse is a great cautionary tale, not only for children but also for adults. The animation gives a life lesson about fear. It shows that you can’t hide beneath the blanket from monsters and bad things will not disappear by turning the lights on. You should conquer your fears and that only you are capable of doing so with your mind and your actions. If you don’t face your fears and make them disappear, you always will be a little mouse who is afraid of the cat’s meow and turning into the lion doesn’t make you a lion.

Author: Bacho Odisharia

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