Culture
The story of the “Georgian Byron” - Nikoloz Baratashvili
09 August, 2018
Nikoloz Baratashvili was a Georgian poet at the beginning of the 19th century. He is sometimes referred as the “Georgian Byron”. The famous Georgian writer and public figure, Ilia Chavchavadze considered him the one who introduced Europeanism to Georgian literature. Nikoloz Baratashvili’s work is a mixture of Georgian nationalism and European Romanticism. His works has had a huge influence on the Georgian literature of his successors.

In spite of his early death and tragic life, the poet left behind a significant
treasure. Due to the lack of financial support from his family, Nikoloz Baratashvili could not continue his studies after graduation at the Gymnasium. His wish to join the army remained unfulfilled because of his lameness. He loved a member of Georgian aristocracy Ekaterine Chavchavadze. She was the daughter of Prince Alexander Chavchavadze, Georgian poet and military figure. Unfortunately, Nikoloz Baratashvili’s love was not reciprocated.
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Ekaterine Chavchavadze, Photo courtesy: www.ka.wikipedia.org

The works of the “Georgian Byron” expressed his internal pains which were close to national dilemmas and challenges. One of his famous poems reflects the struggle of a man against his destiny. Free will and the creative nature of a man fighting against his destiny, signifying the main value of humanity.

Read some of the stanzas from the poem:

It runs; it flies; it bears me on; it heeds no trail nor spoor;
A raven black behind me croaks with ominous eyes of doom;
Speed thee on and onward fly with a gallop that knoweth no bound,
Fling to the winds my stormy thoughts in raging darkness found.

Go onward! onward! cleaving through roaring wind and rain
Over many a mount and many a plain, short'ning my days of pain;
Seek not shelter, my flying steed, from scorching skies or storm;
Pity not thy rider sad, by self-immolation worn...

….By fate repulsed, oh bury me in a dark and lonely grave:
My bloody foe, I fear thee not - thy flashing sword I brave.
Speed thee on and onward fly with a gallop that knoweth no bound,
Fling to the winds my stormy thoughts in raging darkness found.

The yearnings of my restless soul will no in vain have glowed,
For, dashing on, my steel has paved a new untrodden road.
He who follows in our wake, a smoother path will find;
Daring all, his fateful steed shall leave dark fate behind.

First photo courtesy: www.etaloni.ge

Source of the poem: www.poemhunter.com

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President of Georgia Compared Illia the Second to Illia Chavchavadze

Byron & Georgia and Georgia & the EU


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