Culture
Extraordinary photography – Gigo Gabashvili
25 September, 2018
Gigo Gabashvili was a Georgian painter and photographer (1862-1936). He was one of the earliest representatives of the realist school. His works cover all kind of themes and subjects. Gigo Gabashvili is famous for his series of portraits of townsmen, noblemen and peasants.
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The Bazaar in Samarkand, Photo courtesy: en.wikipedia.org

The painting The Bazaar in Samarkand, originally commissioned by Charles Richard Crane (American businessman), was sold for $1.36 million dollars at Christie's (British auction house) in 2006.
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Gigo Gabashvili Photography, Photo
courtesy: www.omodamoda.blogspot.com


Apart from being a painter, Gigo Gabashvili was a great photographer. The collection of his photos were introduced to the public in 2012 for the first time. They were once in glass negative but are currently, preserved at the National Museum of Georgia.
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Gigo Gabashvili Photography, Photo courtesy: www.youtube.com

The photos cover the end of the 19th and the beginning of the 20th century. At that time, everything including art was limited to Soviet ideology. Meanwhile Gigo Gabashvili was taking photos of nude women which was totally unacceptable in this period of time. This explains the photos’ long-time inaccessibility to the public.
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Gigo Gabashvili Photography, Photo courtesy: www.commons.wikimedia.org

Gabashvili brought the approaches established in European photography to his work. Nowadays, he is recognized as an innovator of Georgian photography.
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Gigo Gabashvili Photography, Photo courtesy: www.omodamoda.blogspot.com

First photo courtesy: en.wikipedia.org

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