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Wine remains discovered in Georgia among the world’s 10 most important findings
01 March, 2018
The Archeology, international research magazine of US Archaeological Institute, has named ancient wine remains discovered in Georgia in 2017 among the world’s 10 most important findings.

“Chemical analysis of ceramics found on early Neolithic monuments has proved that this is the ancient wine remains in Near East. Wine acid in huge volume on clay pot, along with other indicators, represents one of the key biological markers of grapes and wine. This signifies that people on this territory used to make
wine 6000 years B.C. – about 500 years earlier of the previous discovery. According to this finding, wild Eurasian grape was firstly used in this region”, the magazine reads.

The findings are the earliest evidence so far of wine made from the Eurasian grape, which is used in nearly all wine produced worldwide.
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Chemical analysis of ceramics has proved that this is the ancient wine remains in Near East

Other findings selected for the Archaeology list include a new genetic and linguistic study revealing genetic traces to ancient Chachapoyas tribe among population living in Peru’s north, underwater remains of the harbour of Lechaion of ancient Corinth in Greece, a large corpus of rock art located along a section of Venezuela’s Orinoco River known as the Atures Rapids and the virtually intact skeleton of the Australopithecus hominid known as Little Foot discovered in South Africa.

As a reminder, archaeologists excavating Neolithic Georgian village found pieces of clay pots containing residues of the world's oldest wine in 2017. The pottery jars were discovered in two Neolithic villages, called Gadachrili Gora and Shulaveris Gora, about 50km south of Georgia’s capital Tbilisi.
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The pottery jars were discovered in two Neolithic villages

People living at Gadachrili Gora and a nearby village were the world’s earliest known vintners—producing wine on a large scale as early as 6,000 B.C., a time when prehistoric humans were still reliant on stone and bone tools.

After international group of scientists discovered oldest archaeological evidence of winemaking near Tbilisi, Georgian wine was included in the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest wine.
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Georgian wine was included in the Guinness Book of World Records as the oldest wine

This gave the discovery major historical importance, dating the remains 600 years earlier than previously known wine remains from Zagros Mountains in Iran.

Leading international publications such as BBC, Time, The Guardian and New York Times have reported about this historic discovery which once again proves that Georgia is a real “cradle of wine”.

Related stories:

Guinness Book of Records declares Georgian wine as world's oldest wine

Why Georgia is a hotspot for natural wines – The Guardian

Oldest evidence of wine-making found near Tbilisi

Scientists about oldest wine traces discovered in Georgia

Leading international publications report on world's oldest wine discovery in Georgia
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