10 Unique things about Georgia
24 July, 2018
10 Unique things about Georgia
1. Kvevri is a large clay fermentation vessel, used for storing and ageing traditional Georgian wine. The vessel is buried in the ground. The process of making wine in kvevris involves pressing the grapes and then pouring the juice, grape skins, stalks and pips into the kvevri. Georgia has revived this ancient method of wine-making dating back to the 6th millennium B.C. You can observe kvevris in large wine cellars of almost every part of Georgia.
geotv.ge
Kvevri, Photo courtesy: Photo courtesy:
www.qvevri.xyz


2. Georgian scripts are among the only 14 existing scripts worldwide. Georgian scripts include three writing systems used to write the Georgian language: Asomtavruli, Nuskhuri and Mkhedruli. Although the systems differ in appearance, all three are written in the lower case (in other words no Capital letters are used) , their letters share the same names and alphabetical order, and are written horizontally from left to right. Mkhedruli is now the standard script of modern Georgian. The Georgian alphabet was announced as one of the world’s most beautiful scripts by www.matadornetwork.com (a collection of millions of travelers across the globe with an unquenchable thirst for adventure and exploration). 
geotv.ge
Georgian alphabet, Photo courtesy: www.matadornetwork.com

3. Most Georgian surnames end either in shvili or dze. Shvili means a child and dze means a son. The suffixes are preceded by various designations. For example, meqvab- (pot-maker) + shvili (child) probably means that the ancestor of the surname’s owner used to be a pot-maker. The surname makharadze contains makhara (somebody made me happy) and dze (son). It may refer to the happiness of a child’s birth.
geotv.ge
Svaneti towers, Photo courtesy: www.sputnik-georgia.com

4. Located in Georgia’s north western region of Svaneti are the unique Tower Houses. Tower houses are particular type of stone structures, built for defensive purposes as well as habitation. Since 1996, the traditional towers of upper Svaneti have been protected as an UNESCO World Heritage Site. Most of the towers date back to the period between 9th and 12th century. 
geotv.ge
Chokha, Photo courtesy: www.ghn.ge

5. Chokha – is a wool coat, typically worn by men, with cartridge holders on the chest. They were once basic folds, later made to hold bullets and gunpowder. Now, they are simply ornamental. The chokha has been in wide use among Georgians from the 9th century until the 1920s. It is still used in Georgia as a symbol of national pride, and is frequently worn by Georgian men at weddings and official functions. There are four types of chokha: the Kartl-Kakheti chokha (Kartli and Kakheti are eastern Georgian provinces), the Khevsur chokha (mainly in the Mtskheta-Mtianeti province of Georgia), the Adjarian chokha (mainly found in western Georgian provinces such as Acharuli and Guria, previously also in Lazona), and the general Caucasian chokha.
geotv.ge
Panduri, Photo courtesy: www.wikipedia.org

6. Panduri - is a traditional Georgian three-string plucked instrument common in Eastern regions of Georgia: such as Pshav-Khevsureti, Tusheti, Kakheti and Kartli. The panduri accompanies heroic, comic and love songs, as well as dance. In the past, the Panduri was played at feasts, weddings and religious events. They have been one of the most important items within the Georgian family.


Krimanchuli- Georgian polyphony

7. Georgia’s traditional music is widely recognized as the earliest polyphony of the Christian world. Vocal polyphony based on ostinato formulas and rhythmic drone are widely evident in all Georgian regional styles. Eastern Georgia is known for pedal drone polyphony (two highly embellished melodic lines develop rhythmically free on the background of pedal drone) and contrapuntal polyphony (three and four part polyphony with highly individualized melodic lines in each part and the use of several polyphonic techniques). Western Georgian contrapuntal polyphony features the local variety of the yodel, known as krimanchuli.
geotv.ge
Mzia and Zezva, Photo courtesy: www.forum.ge

8. Mzia, Zezva and a teenager girl – are reconstructed early human fossils, dubbed Homo Georgicus. They were found in Dmanisi (south eastern part of Georgia) between 1991 and 2005. 1.8 million years ago Homo Georgicus may have been a separate species of human, predating Homo Erectus, and represents the earliest stage of human presence in the Caucasus. 
geotv.ge
Churchkhela, Photo courtesy: www. wikipedia.org

9. Churchkhela and Pelamushi are traditional Georgian sweets. Churchkhela is a candle-shaped candy made of grape must, flour and nuts. Almonds, walnuts, hazelnut are threaded onto a string, dipped in thickened grape juice or fruit juices and then dried. The traditional technology of churchkhela in the Kakheti region (eastern Georgia) was included on the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Georgia list in 2015. Pelamushi is a Georgian dessert porridge made with pressed, condensed grape juice. Chopped nuts are poured over the pelamushi.
geotv.ge
Pelamushi, Photo courtesy: www.lagodekhi.gov.ge

10. A lot of tourists say that the first thing they notice when they visit Georgia is the colour black. These days, Georgians are less obsessed with black clothes. Previously when a family member died, Georgians would traditionally wear black clothes for years. The tradition may have turned into an automatic habit due to the continuous deaths from war and the need to mourn for the dead . Fortunately, this negative trend is changing and more and more Georgians are now wearing more coloruful clothing.


First photo courtesy: www.kobaveshaguri.blogspot.com

Related stories:

Creating “Qvevri” through 3D printed images

Dmanisi Skull and Brand-New Caucasian Democracy

From khinkali to churchkhela: a guide to Georgian food

Georgian church choir performs Radiohead song in an exciting polyphony



Print
Other Stories
Easy summer destinations for Tbilisi travellers
Summer is the busiest period in terms of tourism. Here are 4 places a foreign visitor should see in Georgia, Tbilisi to experience city’s modern and traditional mix.
Sakartvelo TOP-1 – Why is Georgia number 1 for the Belarusian photographer?
Georgia among Georgians is called Sakartvelo. This is the name how the Belarusian tourist calls this country.
American diplomat about Georgia: “Every single city has left me wanting more”
Kristen Crocker, American Diplomat has recently visited Georgia.
Forbes: “Georgia (The Country) Is On Everyone’s Mind”
Forbes, an American business magazine, has recently published an article about Georgia.
Amazon Jungle in Georgia - Kolkheti National Park
Kolkheti National Park is located in the western part of Georgia and intends to protect the wetland nature of Kolkheti.
Abudelauri Colorful Lakes – Magical Place to See In Georgia
A Magical, mysterious place, home of the Khevsuretian Gods, with a view of spectacular Chiukhi Mountain,
Koruldi Lakes in Svaneti – Heaven On Earth
Koruldi Lakes is one of the most magical places in Georgia.
Svaneti – the most untouched place by the outside world
French photographer Julien Pebrel traveled to Georgia last summer.
5 must-see lesser-known places in Kakheti
Kakheti is located in the eastern part of Georgia.
Euronews: "Batumi as a center of youth culture"
Euronews has recently published an article about Batumi, a seaside town in Georgia.
Russian tourist in Batumi explains why Russians should not come to Georgia
It has been more than a week since demonstrations have started in Tbilisi and are held daily.
How "Spend Your Summer in Georgia" campaign started?
The group includes around 207 000 members of Facebook and it has been only couple of days since the campaign was launched.
Why Georgia? – Photographer Eddy Li speaks about his experience
As the number of tourists coming to Georgia rises, so does the number of international photographers.
Visit Gudamakari surrounded by the Greater Caucasus Mountains
Gudamakari is a historical area in northeastern Georgia surrounded by Mtiuleti, Khevi, Khevsureti and Pshavi (slopes of the Greater Caucasus Mountains).
Georgia among Eid Al Fitr destinations
Where to mark Eid Al Firt? This is the question many of the residents of the Arabian countries will ask themselves as soon as Ramadan is over.
Visit Turtle Lake via the renovated cable car
If you are in Tbilisi and looking for a quiet place surrounded by the greenery, Georgian Journal will show you a perfect option.
5 places to visit for entertainment in Tbilisi
Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia offers a lot of options to those visitors who love to go out, have fun and enjoy the active part of the city.
4 reasons why Georgia should be your next destination by Ftnnews
Ftnnews, a website about traveling has recently published an article about why Georgia should be travelers’ next destination.
Georgia and Ukraine have nothing in common when it comes to traveling
Kyiv Post has recently devoted an article to Georgia.
Former Swiss Ambassador to Georgia Lukas Beglinger settles down in Ujarma
Lukas Beglinger, a former ambassador of Switzerland to Georgia has left the homeland to live in Georgia.
The New York Times about Lelo Burti, Georgian folk game
The New York Times has recently dedicated an article to the Georgian folk game Lelo Burti.
Matador Network: Why you need to see Tbilisi before everybody else
Matador Network published an article “Why you need to see Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, before everybody else” two days ago.
Tbilisi’s Architectural Revival
Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia is distinguished by a number of features making the city a unique combination of a modern and old.
History of ancient trade centers in Tbilisi
Bazaar has always played an important role in the life of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia.
Batumi’s sky turned pink on Saturday
The sky of Georgia’s beautiful seaside town, Batumi turned pink two days ago.
PHOTO OF THE DAY
GEL Exchange Rate
Convertor
16.08.2019
17.08.2019
USD
1
USD
2.9182
2.9232
EUR
1
EUR
3.2555
3.2395
GBP
1
GBP
3.5351
3.5561
RUB
100
RUB
4.3899
4.4227