Discover Georgia
The Washington Post writes about a Georgian dish - Ajapsandali
17 August, 2018
Georgian cuisine is becoming more and more popular in other countries, be it in neighbouring ones or further afield. Recently, The Washington Post published an article about a Georgian dish Ajapsandali (and provided readers with the correct pronounciation as well - a-ZHAP-sahn-DOLL-ee).

Ajapsandali is quite a common dish in Georgia and is considered to be a summer and autumn dish, because the dish’s ingredients are usually ripe during these periods of the year.

Ajapsandali has its Mediterranean counterpart called ratatouille. But
this one, is unapologetically spicy, with garlicky Adjika being a central ingredient. Unlike its Mediterranean counterpart, in which the vegetables are too often reduced to mush, Ajapsandali is an oven-roasted medley of firm eggplant and crisp bell peppers, lightly mixed at the last minute with fresh tomato purée and livened up with some chopped cilantro. While customarily served in the final months of summer, when tomatoes and eggplant are bountiful, ajapsandali's warming and sinus-clearing properties make it an optimal winter fare as well.
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Some serve Ajapsandali with fried potatoes

Ajapsandali is popular in the northern Caucasus as well.

Ajapsandali is made from eggplants, different types of herbs, onions and tomatoes. Some add potatoes as well. This version provides readers with the original recipe:

1. 3 large eggplants, stemmed, quartered lengthwise, and cut into 1/2-inch slices (about 4 pounds total)
2. Kosher salt
3. Sunflower or grapeseed oil
4. 2 large onions, chopped
5. 3 large carrots, cut into half moons (about 1 1/2 pounds total)
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Others prefer Ajapsandali with its sauce

6. 3 bell peppers (preferably of various colours), seeded and coarsely chopped
7. 1 large jalapeño pepper, stemmed and seeded and finely chopped (see headnote)
8. 3 large tomatoes, peeled, seeded, squeezed of any extra juices, coarsely chopped (about 2 pounds; see NOTE)
9. 4 cloves garlic; 1 pressed/minced, the other 3 thinly sliced
10. 1 1/2 cups cilantro, finely chopped (leaves and tender stems)
11. 3/4 cup fresh parsley leaves, finely chopped
12. Leaves from 4 or 5 basil sprigs (preferably purple), stacked, rolled and cut into thin ribbons (chiffonade)
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Usually, Ajapsandali is served either slightly or cold

See the instructions for preparation here

Source: The Washington Post

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