Discover Georgia
The Guardian reports about why Georgia is totally worth a visit
10 December, 2018
Two reporters headed to Georgia to find out more about the places of interest, and the Georgian cuisine. Here is what they found out for the British newspaper Guardian.

Tbilisi
It’s a happening place which combines so many influences that every time you think you have a handle on it, there is something new to see. There are brutalist Soviet buildings next to Orthodox churches, and ancient communal courtyards with rickety wooden stairs that look like film sets. Then there are
super-modern, strange empty buildings. However, the sulphur baths didn’t delight the reporter as it was not hot enough to be steamy.

Gori
In Stalin’s birthplace there is an entire museum dedicated to him, full of paintings and tapestries of Stalin holding small girls and photographs of him with Churchill and Roosevelt, and even his death mask.

geotv.ge
The museum dedicated to Stalin, photo courtesy: georgiantour.com

As none of it is in English, the reporter perve over pictures of him when he was young – murderous dictator and all that, but great hair. There is one small room roped off, with some blurry pictures of conflict. This is the only nod to the fact that perhaps he did not deliver heaven on Earth.

Batumi
Batumi is a mini Vegas where all sorts go to gamble. It is full of casinos and Russian girls selling themselves. Russian hospitality seems to be about mainly being ignored. The reporter wanders around looking at strange modern buildings and a not very impressive beach, she says.

Kazbegi
The highlight of the trip is a drive on the Georgian Military Highway from Tbilisi to Stepantsminda (formerly Kazbegi), a route into the High Caucasus established in the first century.

geotv.ge
Stunning views in the Caucasian mountains, photo courtesy: georgia.travel

Green velvet mountains, azure lakes, fresh figs and honey sold by the roadside – totally stunning. I have been in the Himalayas and the Andes, but this is mind-blowingly gorgeous. ‘f, reads the report.

Georgian Cuisine
Georgians love cooking and they love eating – food is of paramount importance in this beautiful, cultured country on the crossroads of Eastern Europe and Western Asia. The key components of Georgian cuisine: burstingly ripe tomatoes, heaps of blue-purple plums and veritable forests of herbs and edible flowers – parsley, tarragon, dill, purple basil and marigold – with spices and salt mixes piled up on tables like little volcanoes of flavour. The reporter gets hooked on lobio, the nurturing bean stew served in clay pots, and khachapuri cheese-breads.

geotv.ge
The rich Georgian cuisine delights the reporter, photo courtesy: grubstreet.com

Georgia is one of the oldest wine-producing countries in the world – there’s evidence of grape fermenting here 8,000 years ago – but the Soviets whittled more than 500 grape varieties down to just four or five, to maximise efficiency. Since then, Georgian winemakers have been working hard to bring lost varieties back to life.

geotv.ge
Georgian Qvevri. A wine vessel made from clay. photo courtesy: allwine.ge

They’ve also revived traditional winemaking methods that fell out of favour during the Soviet era. Wine is fermented in qvevris – giant clay jars buried in the ground for six months or more. Burial in clay keeps the temperature of the wine stable, which means less intervention is needed during fermentation. All the wines the reporter tries, are delicious and distinctive – nuanced and perfumed with an intriguing sweet-savoury balance.

Source:

The Guardian: Georgia on my plate: a culinary journey in the Cauasus

The Guardian: ‘Mind-blowingly gorgeous Georgia’



Related stories:

What type of wine is the most common in Georgia

Georgian desserts to taste in winter

Escape to the country: Visit Lagodekhi


Print