Geopolitical Daydream
27 March, 2014
Geopolitical Daydream
I am opening my eyes in one of these fine spring mornings and guess what – the TV set, in front of which I had fallen asleep the previous night, is still on, with my favorite anchor shoving the breaking news of the day right into my awakening ears and slightly open eyes: Russia has ceded the annexed Abkhazian territory back to Georgia at the request of the Abkhaz population, having asked the Russian government to have the deal approved
as soon as possible because Abkhazians cannot wait to return to their beloved Georgian family, who they have terribly missed due to the quarter-of-a-century absence of Georgians in their overstrained living in misery and deprivation, hoping that the recharged Abkhaz-Georgian love and their reinstated cohabitation would work very much to the benefit of both siblings.
People in Sukhumi and other parts of the returning autonomous republic are in the streets with Georgian flags and banners, chanting emotional slogans in favor of Georgia. The euphoric crowds all over the place are ready to embrace the Georgian refugees, coming back to their beloved Abkhazia in huge swarms. They are entering their long-ago abandoned houses, which the current Abkhazian dwellers have decorated with flowers and welcome signs. The Abkhazian centenarians and their Georgian brothers and sisters are warmly hugging each other and dancing to the tune of their beloved folk music. Kids and the youth are looking at the celebrating grownups with the eyes, full of amazement and curiosity, trying to perceive what the whole cram and racket is all about. The governmental officials on both sides are busy in ubiquitous photo ops, ready to manifest as much benevolence towards each other as possible. Mutual invitations to continue the celebrations in homes are being given out profusely. Georgians and Abkhazians are not making even a single attempt to look back. Their hopeful eyesight is resolutely directed only into the future. I am putting up the TV volume full-blast and the broadcast continues as I am glued to it. Watching the great news on the television and hearing it on the radio, the South Ossetian population is getting excited and starting to follow the Abkhazians in their newly made footsteps. People in Tskhinvali and other places are massively taking to the streets, asking their government, which is still asleep, to take immediate measures for rejoining Georgia forthwith. It is clearly noticeable that they do not want to lag behind and are hurrying to get the job done even before their Abkhazian fellow fighters for Georgia’s reunification. The voice of people in South Ossetia is finally reaching the attention of the Russian government, which confirms its support for the South Ossetian public. Georgia’s territorial reintegration is decreed in black-and-white by local authorities in the two runaway republics, and orally approved by the Russian administration, which is enthusiastically applauding the wise decision. The separatist aspirations in Georgia are forever done with. The news on the television is going on nonstop. The pro-integration movement in Abkhazia and South Ossetia are turning out to be so contagious that now the Nagorno-Karabakh region of Azerbaijan, where most of the population is Armenian, is rebelling against the separatist sentiment, maintained for so long against the will of the Azeri people. Armenians are ardently asking the Russian authorities to leave them alone and to give them a chance to continue talking with their Muslim brothers on their own, without the assistance of their mutual big brother Russia. Believe it or not the Russian troops are leaving the Mountainous Karabagh territory without any qualms. Not even one drop of blood is spilled. The Russians look tired of serving that far away from their motherland as they did in Abkhazia and South Ossetia, going back home with great pleasure and being seen off with flowers and cookies, provided by the excited Armenian and Azeri citizenry. “Behold the formerly separated Transdnestria in Moldova!” – is screaming the TV set deafeningly. They too want to do the same, having heard of grand integration efforts in Georgia. They are also ready to give up their doubtful independence and get reunited with Moldova, forgetting about the old feud and recognizing the evil of separatism. Their Russian friends are very much conscious of the value of their smart decision and are sending their emissary to Transdniestria immediately to bring an encouraging word of sincere felicitations to all of them – Transdniestrians, Moldovans, Russians, Ukrainians and everybody else who thinks that separation is bad and reunification is good. Oh, my God, look at that! – The TV set is bursting of political emotionalism right in front of my eyes: Crimea! What is happening there? Russia is returning the peninsula to Ukrainians ungrudgingly! Down with the conflicts – both frozen and hot! Away with invasions, occupations and annexations! “We are all tired of that crap!” – Russians and Ukrainians are chanting in unison, walking hand-in-hand and equally warmed with life-giving spring sunshine and the warm human smiles, seen everywhere. The Russian soldiers are dropping their rifles like hot potatoes, sticking flowers through their buttonholes, which the beautiful Ukrainian girls are tossing at them coquettishly. The television continues blasting away, exciting the viewers with the abundance of the mindboggling news. The conflicts are dying off. Peace and cooperation is returning to where the human strife and contention had reigned. People in Abkhazia, South Ossetia, Nagorno-Karabakh, Transdniestria and Crimea are happily celebrating their new way of life. Human dreams that finally come true are annihilating the geopolitical evils. Good will and wisdom are overpowering the sinister sable-rattling, giving a new powerful chance to human sweat.The stupid absence of common sense, which had once overwhelmed the now liberated conflict areas, is no longer a case. No more divide-and-rule kind of abominable cynicism! Better thinking, better action, better understanding, better friendship, better cooperation, better life . . . better everything! – This is all becoming likely! I am switching the TV off. Certain daydreams make me feel so good!

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