Expectations, rights, duties...
22 May, 2014
Expectations, rights, duties...
The 27th of June 2014 has officially been declared as the day Georgia will sign the Association Agreement with the European Union, further referred to as the Agreement. I have so many comments on this upcoming event that I don’t even know where to start and how to begin. I have also heard that the long-awaited signing of the document is going to be done by the Prime Minster. Who else! But I am getting increasingly confused with the terminology
we are pushing into our thin political veins, if not clotted at all. I am reading in the press and among the wires that our president is a Chief Executive Officer.
Well, this is either another administrative blunder or a lack of efficiency in the English language. Some of our journalists, especially those who want to write in English, are hearing certain terms and words around, but they often have not the slightest clue what they are saying. For instance, those lighthearted and featherbrained ignoramuses have probably heard that the presidents of countries, companies or universities might also be called chief executive officers, thinking that the president of Georgia might be qualified by that term as well, notwithstanding the function he is enjoying in the country. Georgia’s chief executive officer, however, is the Prime Minister because he is the officer who makes chief executive decisions and delivers upon them. Could there be anything simpler than this? Can we finally discern the plainest of the things? On the other hand, if our Prime Minister is not considered the chief executive of the country, then why am I not told so? In this case the journalistic lapsus linguae might become understandable and forgivable too. So much for the Georgian execs’ titles and powers! The heading of this story seems to be more pressing to discuss than anything else, even the issue of division of power in Georgia. The Agreement has stirred and boosted the nation’s expectations and distressed the imagination of our people beyond any reasonable extent – walking in the unknown is scary and difficult. The propaganda and agitation, working in favor of the Agreement’s popularization is so heavy that the TV and radio loudspeakers are bursting under its weight, and the pages of local newspapers are becoming hot-red. So what is in store for us, when and if the Agreement is signed by the end of this coming June? I am not familiar with the details of this document, and even if I were, I am not sure if this article could accommodate all the important details it probably contains because they say the Agreement happens to be one bulky political document, which might take a busy bee like myself days, if not months to read. I am sure though it is not only about the Georgia’s good and comfortable future but also about certain cumbersome duties and responsibilities that this country will have to carry as a consequence of signing it. It cannot be otherwise! This is where my biggest hesitation is! This is where my worst misgiving lies! This is where my most bothering question comes into play! Are we going to be capable of efficiently delivering on the duties and obligations that are most likely stipulated in the Agreement? I understand that we are going to try but trying is very far from actually doing things. I like trying but I also feel that only trying may not be enough to take us where we want to be. The Agreement is not going to be a one-way street: you take – you give! Giving does not scare me at all. I have never been afraid of commitments. As a matter of fact, I like giving more than taking but if you want to give, you must first have what you want to give. Do we have enough to give? How much do we have if we have at all? And for how long will it be enough to keep giving? How about the responsibility to deliver on what we might be obligated to be delivering on in case the Agreement is signed? A duty is a duty, isn’t it? And escaping it will not be admissible ever. The European Union is not the former Soviet Union, where a failure to deliver was forgivable in most cases because it was just one big-pocketed social and economic conglomerate, and some other body would always come up to salvage you if you had failed to live up to the expectations. To be an independent country, especially of a western standard, is absolutely different from being a Soviet Socialist Republic, nursed and pampered by the rest of the big country like the USSR. National independence means moving your own feet and hands, and making your brains a little more functional. Not like in the good old family of Soviet republics! Independence means risks in the first place and responding to those risks in an appropriate fashion. Can we do that? I wish we could! Europe is Europe, and it is part of the western world which is used to delivering on duties and promises. Our habitual bla-bla will not be working in our association with the European Union. Once we are associated with the cherished Union, we will have to endure the demands and attitudes we have never tasted before, including the inevitable Russian fury and desire to keep teaching us both historic and historical lessons. The bear has not yet recovered from her beloved sister Ukraine’s European frolics, and all of a sudden, here goes another baby sister who has become so coquettish about becoming a new Euro player. Let’s assume that we get lucky enough to see the bear swallow the offensive pill. Then what? Can we live with the European level of accountability? Are we aware that our future European family is rich, stringent, respectful, responsible and accountability-obsessed part of the world? If not, then we have to learn this quickly!

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