Political Stereotypes
05 June, 2014
Political Stereotypes
The history of Georgia is long and eventful, and it is excessively charged with numerous political stereotypes – both good and bad. Categorizing those stereotypes and subjecting them to thorough analysis could prove to be a worthy theoretical effort, but it might as well take a lifetime, and many bulky volumes into the bargain. I think it is too late for me to embark on the project of this magnitude. I would rather take up some of those political stereotypes
that are currently in action in the country, creating either a desired or deleterious effect in the life of our having-seen-and-felt-it-all people. Let us take for example, the pronounced orientation of our politicians of almost every generation in the last hundred years, on material well-being.

This is a shining paradigm of one of those political stereotypes I am talking about: a politician wanting the elected or assigned political position mostly for enhancing his or her personal standard of living – as clear and plain as that! The political arena in Georgia is a propitious soil for reaping the fruits of good life, the seeds of which a certain politician has never actually sown. Another Georgian political stereotype which bothers me is promises made and nothing delivered on those promises. The naive and expectant electorate is prone to believe glib and mendacious politicians, who always have the abundance of enthusiastic promises, but results – never! Is this a disease of our politicians, which they cannot get rid of? Why are they lying so interminably, and on every subject they are usually dwelling upon? Could lying be part of their profession by any chance? But the funniest thing is that people want and are ready to believe them. What is it? Is it the hope for a better life, which we are all clinging to so desperately? It might be our illusion that finally something good will come out of a politician’s promise. Well, patience is a good feature to have in character, but how many times and for how long can that patience last? So this political stereotype is probably the most frustrating among the ones that are hurting us so much. The third unsavory political stereotype in Georgia is the overwhelming predisposition for the one-party system. There is a lot of talk about pluralism and democracy in this country, where Western political ideas, methods and style are loudly venerated. We are all for it – as if! At least, this is the overall predominant impression, made by our political spectrum on us, and journalistically confirmed by our means of mass communication. In reality, every incoming new political force is doing its best to annihilate the opposing political force, which is done for only one purpose – to remain in the political arena as a singular decision-making force, thus reigning in the legislative body and imposing on the nation the rules and laws that are compatible only with the principles of that particularized and enduring political force. There is one more harmful political stereotype, working destructively in Georgia – the unrestrained sense of obvious animosity and physical hatred among the opposing politicians. The repugnance which they feel for each other is so apparent that they are ready to physically hurt one another, and if there were a chance to get away with it, they would destroy a political rival completely, using for this any means that might come handy at the moment. Where is the unbridled physical hatred coming from? Could there be a professional psycho-analytical interpretation to it? We can probably argue that most Georgian men are oversensitive and emotionally unbalanced, and they often display their dissatisfaction physically, desiring to beat up an opponent. We can say in a rather benign tone that we are not brought up to check violence within ourselves. Or, let us say, our explosive character does that funny job with us. OK, this could all be granted as part of our national character, which is probably forgivable – we are all humans after all. But, I think it goes a little deeper, and the roots of hatred in our political culture should be looked for in the degree of material helpfulness of those political jobs, which the politicians are so readily poised to get. This is a process of not only of power division, but the division of wealth in the first place. Hence the war and settlement of arguments by means of using a physical power! Politicians are fighting each other for a piece of bread, and if the bread is also covered with butter and honey, then the bloodshed is inevitable. This is why there are so many beaten-up and bloodstained mugs and broken ribs in the Georgian political field. This is a ferocious fight for a comfy spot under the sun. Shall we go on with the examples of negative political stereotypes in Georgia? We certainly can, but this might take pages and pages of this edition. Here is another one though: the so called black PR and unending recriminations towards each other in our political circles. Black PR, often very unfair and absolutely untruthful is ubiquitous here. And our politicians are using this medium of political struggle as if it is an absolutely lawful and ordinary thing to do. Reliance on black PR in the political arena is just another ordinary tool, which burns nobody’s mouth and hands. On the contrary, it is simply taken for granted as if nothing unusual is happening. Vilification of an opponent looks like the most enjoyable hobby in our political reality, and it also is very contagious. It becomes part of the nature of the Georgian political elite. There are other interesting political stereotypes that need mentioning and evaluation, but I would rather stop here. The thrown-in examples should be enough for now to produce a signal that those stereotypes are not doing good service to the Georgian politics in general. They are only damaging the political image of this nation. Meanwhile, we badly need to have a winning national image, don’t we?


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