The Abkhaz Quagmire
23 October, 2014
The Abkhaz Quagmire
Georgia does not have a state border with Abkhazeti a.k.a. Abkhazia because Georgia cannot have a state border with Abkhazeti for a very simple reason that Abkhazeti is an integral and unalienable part of Georgia, currently occupied by another state. This is what Georgians are saying! Russians are saying the contrary, and the Abkhaz are saying nothing because nobody is asking them to say anything. Presently, Georgia has only an accidentally cropped up moral borderline with Abkhazeti, reminding a trivial strife
between the brothers who were once abetted and set against each other by a sneaky cynical third party, as an unfortunate consequence of which the two stupid simpletons had a harsh fratricidal fight, followed by a long and exhausting period of nonspeaking terms and unsettled familial belligerency. This is an overall situation, to put it in simple wording. Taking this situation as a favorable given, which is as a clear as noonday to the rest of the world, the occupant party now desires to legalize the occupancy – the appetite comes with eating – but the legalization of occupancy is nothing short of forceful taking over somebody else’s territory and just as forceful assimilation of a smaller nation, which is dwindling away anyway. Now, the occupied land is the territory, called Abkhazeti, the historical owner of the land is Georgia and the occupant country is Russia. Up until now, the loss-ridden Georgians were trying not to lose courage and hope, desperately grasping at a straw in an attempt to re-embrace its beloved natural part and take such a good care of it in the future that Georgia’s Abkhaz brothers could truly believe in our reinstated brotherhood. To the bitterest chagrin of ours, this is not happening. What is happening instead is that Russia is finally and irreversibly grabbing Abkhazeti, thus creating an unbearable grief in the hearts of every Georgian, living in this country and beyond it. The anguish is truly insurmountable for all of us, and the inflicted excruciating pain is augmented due to the recognition of our own sickening impotence to change anything. Meanwhile, a regular Russian, believing in the fairness of the Russian government’s geopolitical steps, no matter how ill-considered those steps might be, is thinking that the expansion of Russia at the expense of her smaller neighbors is Russia’s Manifest Destiny which should be respected by the rest of the astonished world. With Abkhazeti gone for good, a shift is going to take place in the Georgian national psyche, saying nothing about the versatile losses we are going to suffer as the accompaniment to the fact of final breaking away of the huge piece of our land. Georgia, in the first place, is going to feel abandoned by the international community, which had formally supported its territorial integrity in the last twenty odd years. Georgia will be left to its own devices. Certainly, Georgia cannot afford openly demonstrating its frustration and annoyance, but it might be compelled to revise its attitude towards what used to be considered as optimum in its geopolitical behavior. Georgia might find itself faced with a new choice. What that choice could be is the matter of re-philosophizing over its past, present and future in a wiser fashion. At times of balanced political deliberation, the triviality of the situation, created by Russia by its intention to ‘take care’ of Abkhazeti, seems to be very simple – intervene unscrupulously, occupy perfidiously, recognize hypocritically and annex unconscionably. There cannot be anything simpler and more straightforward! I also believe that our strategic and intellectual share in losing the territories is also considerable – we have definitely assisted Russia to make it easier for herself, but it makes no sense to cry over the spilt milk now. What we are doing right now is that we keep looking straight into the eye of the storm, around which the Abkhaz quagmire has swollen – Georgia’s unabated curse and plague. And the world seems to be tending to put up with the dire finale of the twenty-year diplomatic jiggle. Frankly, there is nobody on earth who would genuinely care whether Abkhazeti is part of Georgia or chunk of Russia, except us Georgians. Giving up on Abkhazeti practically means losing the Georgian identity. Georgia’s prolonged and desperate scream about the heartbreakingly insoluble Abkhazeti quandary has probably sounded as the voice in the wilderness. Let me shout it again and again: Abkhazeti is Georgia, and this may not be otherwise! Taking Abkhazeti away from Georgia is equal to mortifying Georgia and disabling the Georgian nation forever. Russia has always wanted to have the beautiful land of Abkhazeti, only without the Abkhaz, and they are going to have it soon, exactly the way they wanted to have it. Those who desire and are ready to help Georgia to continue as what Georgia has always been must understand that Georgia will never be the same again if Abkhazeti is cut off from its body. Georgia will bleed to death if this wound is inflicted on its fragile and vulnerable body. Russia does not want to understand this, or she understands it all, but does not care what happens to the Georgian people. Does the rest of the world? Territorial Integrity is not just words for Georgia. Territorial Integrity is the source of life for us. Is this so difficult to understand? And if we are understood and heard, why is it so impossible to help us out? Does Russia really need that badly to eat up Georgia piece by piece? Should I believe that Russia’s national security really depends on her having that tiny part of Georgia’s territory under its control? Where is this Russian vulnerability coming from? Could it be deliberately concocted for some obfuscated cause or enigmatic reason? Nobody will ever know that!

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