Editor's comment
Forms of Hatred
16 September, 2015
Anything that the world is concerned about and is dwelling upon verbally or practically has become a subject of discourse in Georgia too. This is one of our achievements in the wake of burying the communist ideology, maintained within the soviet political framework, and adopting the new rules of life, based on freedom and democracy. Now the problem is if we have enough ability to reason and rationalize on those still vibrant issues so wisely that the drawn conclusions have
favorable bearing on the life of our society. Holistically speaking, racism, sexism, ageism and all other bigotries of the sort have been formally rejected by most of the humanity – Georgia included of course – but they are still around to be in the way of general progress and development. By an alternative definition, racism is a form of hatred of racial groups or individuals of different skin colors for each other. Georgia has not known this type of hatred because there have never lived people of various races here – thus avoiding the inconvenience – although the picture has somewhat changed lately: We see today in Georgia persons of various complexion, features and pigmentation which are not always taken kind and easy by us. I have heard complaints around concerning the reaction of Georgians to atypical (for them) skin colors. So until the ‘teaser’ is not in sight, things are OK, but suffice it to appear among us the people who are not exactly like us, we start fidgeting and ogling them with unabashed curiosity. This might also be true when varied indigenous Georgian cultures are clashing, this being pure expression of parochialism, which is close to racism in character. For instance, a person of one clearly-cut parochial structure might think twice to marry a person from another part of Georgia because customs and habits might differ greatly between those Georgian corners. Sexism is also a form of hatred, only between people of different genders. We will have to admit that this type of bigotry has almost flourished in Georgia. Sexual harassment is probably one of the worst and most common ramifications of sexism, which our society has not yet taken up high enough as a worthy subject of public discussion.

Sexism is also a form of hatred, only between people of different genders. We will have to admit that this type of bigotry has almost flourished in Georgia.

Meanwhile, this offensive inclination, especially among our male population, is still persisting on many different levels, both among adults and youth the same way. The unwelcome physical touching, embarrassing up-and-down eyeing, uninvited insinuations, undressing looks and risqué storytelling remain commonplace in our everyday life. It should also be recognized that in the last quarter of a century our society has been trying to change in this and many other significant respects – somewhat lazily and tardily though. I don’t really know if sexism is in our blood and custom, but I can say without any twinges of conscience that it is present in practice, which could actually be considered as the most glowing prerequisite for much-discussed violence against women in this country. In a word, Georgia is not completely done with the male chauvinist pigging, and I doubt that it will be any time soon, judging by the common male behavior here. Let us not forget that the flimsy sporadic flash on our TV screen of the fight against gender discrimination is not a real solution to the problem. On TV, we mostly see the freedom-loving fashion-oriented good-looking young boys and girls who manifest their propensity towards contemporary western lifestyle, whereas the reality should be looked for deeper in the life of masses around the country – prejudice is reigning all over the place, intolerance does not need an equipped eye to be noticed, and narrow-mindedness has to be pinned down and irradiated. Added to so many unsavory ‘isms’, now ageism has occupied our agenda for discussing various contemporary problems, bothering every normal society. Ageism is a form of hatred too, which is perpetuated towards senior citizens by those who think that people over sixty are not entitled to the same pleasures of life and challenges of action as those who are under that age line. We have recently witnessed the effect of ageism in Georgia when life experience and knowledge of the mature but still perfectly functional people were drained down the tubes. This was a harmful misjudgment and a deadly miscalculation. Any society needs to be using the accumulated lore and experience which is often worth gold and diamond. Nobody can afford throwing them away.

We have recently witnessed the effect of ageism in Georgia when life experience and knowledge of the mature but still perfectly functional people were drained down the tubes.

There is another side of ageism: it denies good life to those who feel same emotion and desire to continue living as the people of younger age. We all get older and we all need to maintain sense of happiness at any stage of our lives. Surely, there is distinction between the ages but the dissimilarity should not be allowed to give way to the philosophy of hatred. The young and the old need each other for not killing the great idea of continuing life. Resentment between them and their mutual discrimination will make the world an angrier place to live. And vice versa, recognition of each other’s merits and careful treatment of each other’s flaws only makes the world an easier place to go by. This is all part of the ongoing process, called the humanization of our being, which cannot be achieved without saying our utmost No to the patterns of bigotry that are still here.
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