SOCIETY
No Small Nations in Great Deeds
25 October, 2012

Hungary celebrates ‘double 56’, i.e. the 56th anniversary of the 1956 Revolution

On October 22, Hungarian Embassy to Georgia celebrated the 56th anniversary of 1956 Hungarian Revolution.

“We, Hungarians, celebrate this anniversary not only in Hungary, but also outside the country, wherever Hungarians live, from the neighboring countries to Australia,” Mr. Sandor Szabo, Ambassador of Hungary declared at the beginning of his eloquent speech. “What does 1956 mean to us, Hungarians? What is the main message of this unparalleled historical event? First

of all, the events of 1956 in Hungary suggest that this people, this nation is freedom-loving in the highest sense of the word; Hungarians want to decide the most important issues, affecting  their lives and destiny, on their own. This attempt failed in 1956. The superpower defeated the will of the people. The feeling and the spirit of freedom stayed awake even after 1956, though in the subsequent years it was not even allowed to talk about it, let alone to undertake something for it.“

According to the Ambassador, history showed that the events of 1956 already had antecedents in Central Europe, and later had a significant impact on the events in other countries. “This is what we are so proud of! There is no small nation when you speak of great deeds! We also believe that the change of system in 1989-1990 in Hungary can be considered as a straight continuation of the 1956 revolution; the efforts of political forces participating in the transition stemmed from the unrealized goals of1956, and these efforts have already led to the results which we, all Hungarians can enjoy today.”

Later, H.E. Ambassador talked about the importance of celebrating this remarkable event in Georgia. “I believe that it is particularly appropriate to speak about the powerful affirmation of freedom and independence in the amicable Georgia where these values are also of utmost importance.“ Then, Mr. Szabo mentioned the late political events, namely, the October 1 parliamentary elections: “We witnessed the historical manifestation of Georgian people’s free will. The voters themselves, without outside interference, decided to who they would entrust the future governance of the country. We, Hungarians, together with all other member states of the European Union and the NATO, express our heartfelt congratulations on this! We wish Georgian political forces at the new parilament, either in majority or in minority, to create the conditions which will ensure that the next year, the various branches of power – the President, executive and legislative powers – work together tirelessly for the country and for the benefit of the people living here.”

At the end of his speech, the Hungarian Ambassador expressed his hopes that the bilateral links will be not only preserved but deepened as well. “Hungary strives to develop good and successful bilateral relations with Georgia as before. This is dictated by our national interests linked to the South Caucasus, together with Georgia, which includes political and energy security, investment and economic motivations. The Hungarian government is willing and is able to cooperate with the current Georgian government in power. We continue to support the country’s European and Euro-Atlantic integration, which can only be achieved by the fulfillment of a number of preconditions; however, seeing the commitments made by the new Georgian government to be adopted this week, we can have no doubt that Tbilisi, as always, will continue to undertake great efforts to achieve this goal.”

Among a lot of distinguished guests, Georgian Journal came across a very interesting lady Julia Kupper. She is genetically Hungarian, but she was born and raised in Georgia. She is one of those very few who can hardly be called Diaspora. Julia’s grandfather, like many of his compatriots, fell victim to the 1956 Revolution. Her Grandmother, who is actually her only Georgian relative, was left with three sons. She died at the age of 94 (three years ago) and held back from applying for the citizenship of Hungary, thus attempting to maintain her Georgian spirit and aspiration. “My father, who was the youngest son, came to Tbilisi to study at the Academy of Arts, met with my mother, and they got married.” Ala was from Ukraine. It happened so that they divorced and his father returned to his homeland Hungary. However, Julia stayed with her Ukrainian mother in Georgia who brought her to the Georgian school, which caused her acquiring a Georgian mentality. “I think in Georgian, have Georgian friends and am desperately in love with this country.  My friends are making fun of me that I am the most Georgian non-Georgian ever”,  Julia says, adding that she really feels herself more Georgian than Hungarian, though, she is rather bifurcated. She likes Hungary too, with which she got acquainted from her early childhood.

Now Julia has a Georgian husband and a 18-year-old daughter. However, she never forgets that in the Central Europe, there is a beautiful country called Hungary, which she thinks, is more like Georgia in some sense than other Central European states, and it is ready to recive her whenever she can afford to go there. It is so very weird that two of her sisters from her father’s side, father, uncles and cousins are all there, and relatives from her mother’s side are in Ukraine, but she still is stuck in Georgia, her birthplace. “In 1993, I went to Hungary, intending to settle there, but soon I realized that I could not live without Georgia. Upon returning, when I saw the mountains of the Caucasus, I was so impressed that I began weeping,” Julia confesses. Her grandmother preserved most Georgian traditions – her Hungarian sisters and cousins used to call her “Bebiko” (Granny in Georgian). They all knew Khachapuri, which she used to bake for them, as well as the mandatory dish of Georgian cuisine – Satsivi, which the Georgian granny would by all means prepare for every the New Year day. “I am a real Georgian, one of you, and I was very worried about the latest political events. I really wanted to leave this country for the second time, but now everything is quieter. My husband used to live in the States and I had a lot of opportunities to go there too, but I could not. I want to live in a peaceful and happy Georgia. Personally I have always felt happy here and I don’t want to lose these relations for the sake of nothing,” concludes Julia, who symbolizes the friendship and love between two nations.

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