SOCIETY
Inevitability of Soviet Economic Collapse
22 September, 2011

The soviet political elite sagaciously predicted that a big chaos was in store for them to cope with, and they decided to extract maximum material gains of this colossal destruction. Professor Simon Maskharashvili has more.

GJ – By the way, in Socialist China the similar processes had started at the same time, initiated and headed by Deng Xiaoping – Chinese politician and reformer – occupying the post of the chairman of Central Advisory Commission of the Communist Party of China.

SM – Actually,

this was one more proof of the failure of the soviet economic model anywhere it was attempted to introduce. As it became clear later, the discussion of the collapsing soviet economy by the soviet communist party elite had reached the ears of higher ranks of the soviet security services. There were two of them functioning in the USSR – KGB and GRU. KGB does not need much of the introduction, it was a wide-scale counter-intelligence service, but GRU (Glavnoye Razvedyvatel’noye Upravleniye) is the foreign military intelligence directorate of the General Staff of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation. Both were of course under the control of the communist party elite. They were managed by the party and the party bosses. If capitalism was admitted in the Soviet Union, bulk of the revenues and various financial gains would land in the hands of those party elite. And the state security services would be assigned a role of their plain protectors with relevant compensation of course. The state security servicemen served the soviet communist ideology throughout their lifetime. That was their main obligation. They were also very closely familiar with the foreign social, economic and political cultures and the capitalist life-style. They were the first to notice the signs of collapse of the Soviet motherland. It was funny that now they were compelled to serve the system (capitalism) which their ideology had defied and they were fighting all their lives, based on their professional mentality and soviet ideology.

GJ – The relevant strategy had been worked out probably to cope with the new situation. Is this true?

SM – They sagaciously predicted that a big chaos was in store for them to be coping with, and they decided to extract maximum material gains out of this colossal destruction.

GJ – Do you mean the mess and confusion which could arrive as a consequence of introduction of private ownership on means of production and land, and the legalization of private ownership on industrial enterprises and real estate?

SM – I don’t mean only the economics. They were to fish in generally troubled waters. They knew that they could grab a lot if they behaved accordingly. There had never been a chance like that to become rich. What an unexpected windfall was in making!

GJ – Did they also try to take advantage of the political mess that had formed in the Soviet country?

SM – Absolutely! The political mess that reigned in the entire USSR and was step by step becoming very evident, the party elite and their protectors were looking for new and even better opportunities than ever before. In order for them to put the Soviet people into a totally new gear of social and political life, they needed to do a lot of preparatory work, and that was a theoretical, a psychological groundwork to be done as a homework. And PR had always been a strong point of the soviet government.

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