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Hitler's secret cognac and champagne stash found beneath German restaurant
13 June, 2015
A well-known German restaurateur claims to have found a secret store of cognac and champagne that once belonged to Adolf Hitler , The Telegraph reports.
Silvio Stelzer found the liquor stored in a deep complex of cellars under the gardens of his restaurant in Saxony.
He said he had also found ledgers which showed Hitler's staff had moved the valuable bottles there to protect them from Allied air raids on Berlin.
Hitler rarely drank,
and it is likely the brandy and champagne would have been used for entertaining.
Mr Stelzer said the records also showed Hitler's staff had also sent cheese, salami, chocolate and cigarettes to be stored in the cellars.
At the time much of the German population was starving because of wartime food shortages.
Mr Stelzer made the find at his restaurant in a historic villa on the grounds of the famous Moritzburg Water Palace.
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While renovating the grounds, workmen stumbled on a six-storey deep complex of cellars under the garden.
"At the end of 1944 Adolf Hitler had his household food and drink stores moved to my cellar by his steward Kannegiesser, as they were not safe because of air raids on Berlin," Mr Stelzer told Bild newspaper.
"Nothing remained of the food and consumables. After May 8, 1945, Russian troops looted everything," he said.
But the cognacs and champagne survived in the cellars.
Mr Stelzer said the records also showed Hitler's staff had also sent cheese, salami, chocolate and cigarettes to be stored in the cellars.
At the time much of the German population was starving because of wartime food shortages.
Mr Stelzer made the find at his restaurant in a historic villa on the grounds of the famous Moritzburg Water Palace.
While renovating the grounds, workmen stumbled on a six-storey deep complex of cellars under the garden.
"At the end of 1944 Adolf Hitler had his household food and drink stores moved to my cellar by his steward Kannegiesser, as they were not safe because of air raids on Berlin," Mr Stelzer told Bild newspaper.
"Nothing remained of the food and consumables. After May 8, 1945, Russian troops looted everything," he said.
But the cognacs and champagne survived in the cellars, The Telegraph informs.

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